Maximising the value of qualitative methods in the development and evaluation of behaviour change interventions

  • J. McSharry
  • E. Toomey
  • K. Matvienko-Sikar
  • M. Byrne
  • A. Schneider
  • V. Morrison

Abstract

Aims: • To provide worked examples of the use of qualitative methods at different intervention development and evaluation stages • To reflect on the incorporation of health psychology models and frameworks in qualitative research • To highlight barriers and facilitators to the use of qualitative methods in behaviour change research • To generate discussion on how to maximise the value of qualitative methods in behaviour change intervention development and evaluation Rationale: Qualitative research is increasingly recognised as essential for successful health behaviour change intervention development and evaluation. In line with this year’s conference theme, this symposium will provide examples of the use of qualitative methods at all intervention development stages and facilitate reflection on how health psychology can contribute to future innovations in the use of qualitative methods in behaviour change research. Summary: Our symposium will showcase the use of qualitative methods from the review of existing literature all the way to intervention evaluation. Presentation 1 will describe the use of qualitative evidence synthesis, an increasingly popular review technique, to explore parental experiences of infant feeding behaviours. The second presentation will provide an example of interviews conducted to understand the context of an intervention to increase attendance at structured education for type 2 diabetes. The third presentation will describe the integration of stakeholder engagement with qualitative analysis using the COM-B model, to inform development the D1 Now Intervention for young adults with diabetes. Presentation four will describe a qualitative process evaluation of interventions to reduce antibiotic prescribing in general practice. Session 5 will be interactive, and promote awareness of existing supports for qualitative intervention research and brainstorm ideas for further training and development needs in this area. Finally, the discussant session will identify key messages from the symposium and reflect on the future of qualitative methods in behaviour change research.
Published
2017-12-31
Section
Symposia