Participation in alcohol abstinence challenges can lead to improvements in general well-being

  • E. Robinson
  • R. de Visser

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Periodic abstinence from alcohol may convey physiological benefits, but its effects on general well-being are less well-known. Nor is it known how use of different forms of support during alcohol abstinence challenges affects success rates. METHODS: 4232 British adults participating in the “Dry January” alcohol abstinence challenge completed a baseline questionnaire and a 1-month follow-up questionnaire. Key variables assessed at baseline included measures of alcohol consumption and drink refusal self-efficacy (DRSE). Key variables assessed at follow-up related to whether respondents completed the abstinence challenge, and their use of support provided by Dry January FINDINGS: Participation in Dry January was related to increases in DRSE and well-being among all respondents, but these changes were larger among people who successfully completed the challenge. In multivariate analysis, greater use of support provided by Dry January was a significant independent predictor of completing the abstinence challenge (along with more moderate alcohol intake at baseline, greater emotional DRSE, and being male). CONCLUSIONS: Participation in alcohol abstinence challenges can lead to improvements in general well-being. There is a need to continue to provide support to people undertaking alcohol abstinence challenges.
Published
2017-12-31
Section
Oral presentations