Relationships between the number- and impact of negative life events, burnout an perceived organizational support

  • A. Koolmees
  • M. Pouwelse
  • A. Brouwers
  • N. Hoefsmit

Abstract

Background Based on the Michigan Stress Model this survey examined the relationships between the number- and impact of experienced negative life events and burnout and the possible moderation by perceived organizational social support. Methods Using online questionnaires, data were obtained from 275 employees (53.5% male, 46.5% female) who became redundant due to reorganization at a Dutch banking organization. The number- and impact of negative life events were measured with a custom selection of the Social Readjustment Rating Scale (SRRS). Burnout was measured with the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI-NL) and perceived organizational social support with the Survey of Perceived Organizational support (SPOS). Findings As expected, hierarchical regression analysis showed a significant positive relationship between the perceived impact of negative life events and burnout. Contrary to our expectation, there was no significant relationship between the number of life events and burnout. Perceived organizational social support moderated the relationship between the number of negative life events and burnout significantly, but no significant moderation was found in case of the impact of negative life events. Instead there was a direct negative relation between the impact of negative life events and perceived social support. Discussion The results are partly in line with the Michigan Stress Model. This particularly concerns the significant interaction of the relationship between the number of negative life events and burnout by organizational social support. The findings can contribute to the performance of the multi-annual path of the Dutch government to reduce work related absenteeism and increase sustainable employability.
Published
2017-12-31
Section
Oral presentations