Exposure to psychosocial risk factors and consequences for elderly home care and support workers’ health

  • A. Casini
  • R. Bensliman

Abstract

Background: Home care and service workers are exposed to specific psychosocial risk factors. This study aims at evaluating which of the job-specific psychosocial risk factors predict burnout, musculoskeletal problems (MSP), and somatic stress symptoms (SSS) in elderly home care and support workers in the Walloon region of Belgium. Methods: 915 elderly home care and support workers (97.4% women) employed in 9 social enterprises filled an adapted version of the COPSOQ II questionnaire. Multiple linear regressions were computed including burnout, MSP, SSS as outcome variables, and quantitative, emotional, and cognitive job demand, job predictability, influence on work, work pace, possibilities for personal development, suffered violence, and work-home conflict as predictors. In addition, ANOVAs and post-hoc tests were performed in order to compare domiciliary job subtypes (i.e. healthcare jobs, and (non-)qualified service jobs) in terms of different exposure to the studied psychosocial risk factors. Findings: Results show that quantitative, and emotional job demand, work pace, possibilities for personal development, suffered violence, and work-home conflict predict burnout (R² = .273; all p < .05). Quantitative, and emotional job demand, job predictability, and work pace predict MSP (R² = .119; all p < .05). Emotional job demand, work pace, and work-home conflict predict SSS (R² = .172; all p < .05). Moreover, differences exist between job subtypes in terms of exposition to the studied psychosocial risk factors. Discussion: In order to improve the health of elderly home care and support workers, targeted interventions to address job-specific psychosocial risk factors should be implemented.
Published
2017-12-31
Section
Oral presentations